Contreplongées


> Panagiota Kallimani


Choreography Panagiota Kallimani
With Laurie Young ou Mai Ishiwata, Emilio Urbina, Panagiota Kallimani
Actor Alexandro Siatras

Scenography Heike Schuppelius
Music Stavros Gasparatos
Costumes Penny Calle
Lights Sakis Birbilis

 

Executive Production Les Productions de la Seine
Coproduction Centre Culturel Onassis, Athènes - Grèce
Artistic residency CCN Roubaix Nord-Pas-de-Calais
With support of du Théâtre Paul Éluard de Choisy-le-Roi.
Rehearsals 2013-2014 Centre culturel Onassis Athènes (Grèce), Théâtre Paris – Villette (France), Ménagerie de Verre – StudioLab (France), Centre national de la danse Pantin/ïle de France.


This project is about climbing inside our own interior labyrinth. Channelling the grave economic crisis currently affecting Greece, this piece  focuses on an overpowering sensation of claustrophobia, closing in, the loss of certain senses and the rediscovery of identity. Anyone walking through the streets of Athens cannot help but see the major changes imposed upon the city by the worsening economic crisis. The homeless people now filling the streets of Athens are different, they’re “normal” people we would never have imagined would be facing the loss of their homes.
So it was in the street that I met a pair of sixty-year old lovers: without any work or families to support them, they had begun living in the street. I gave them both disposable digital cameras and asked them to take pictures of “what they would like to have,” and “what would make them happy.” The cameras also circulated among other homeless people they knew, and the images I saw were astonishing, completely different from the conventional stuff I’d expected. Of course I did find photos of comfy beds, fancy shoes in store windows and hot meals, but these amateur photographers who were drifting around the city “like tourists” also brought me images of pigeons and some tender portraits. In order to survive in the streets, the homeless do not allow themselves to truly fall asleep; their senses, especially their hearing, must always be “on.” What happens to their sense of smell, of taste? How does the sense of touch change when you’re obliged to wear layers and layers of clothing to protect your body from the cold and from sexual attacks? We are told that the homeless have refined their senses, sharpened them to match those of the dogs who frequently accompany them. This brings out in me: feelings of claustrophobia, the labyrinth and its Minotaur (a creature half-human, half animal.
However this piece is not about seeing lives of the homeless in a different way. My encounter with them brought about explorations claustrophobia, hope and my own wish for happiness. How do you recover your physical and moral capacity when you also are feeling lost ?
What do you expect? How do you deal wih the inevitable obstacles?

 

Last tour

> 11 Feb. 2016 - Ville de Pamiers

> 24 & 25 Feb. 2014 - Théâtre Paris Villette

> 6 & 7 Feb. 2014 - Centre culturel Onassis, Athènes - Grèce

 

Photographic exhibition

Anyone walking through the streets of Athens cannot help but see the major changes imposed upon the city by the worsening economic crisis. The homeless people now filling the streets of Athens are different, they are “normal” people we would never have imagined would be facing the loss of their homes.

 

She gave to some of them disposable digital cameras and asked them to take pictures of « what they would like to have» and « what would make them happy ». The cameras also circulated among other homeless people they knew, and the images she saw were astonishing, completely different from the conventional stuff she would expected. Of course she did !ind photos of comfy beds, fancy shoes in store windows and hot meals, but these amateur photographers who were drifting around the city “like tourists” also brought me images of pigeons and some tender portraits.

 

In order to survive in the street, the homeless do not allow themselves to truly fall asleep ; their senses, especially their hearing, must always be “on”. What happens to their sense of smell, of taste ? How does the sense of touch change when you’re obliged to wear layers and layers of clothing to protect your body from the cold and from sexual attacks ? We are told that the homeless have re!ined their senses, sharpened them to match those of the dogs who frequently accompany them. This brings out in her : feelings of claustrophobia, the labyrinth and its Minotaur (a creature half- human, half-animal).